Insights From Lawyers: Blockchain at Berkely’s Legal Panel

Thijs Maas

Thijs Maas is a Dutch LLM student who developed a keen interest in the interplay between distributed ledger technologies and law. He started LawAndBlockchain.eu to help narrow the increasing gap between legal doctrine and regulatory challenges posed by blockchain-based asset classes.

Last week, Blockchain at Berkely, a student organization dedicated to the promotion of blockchain research, organized a major blockchain conference. One panel in particular drew my attention. You guessed it: it’s the legal blockchain panel.

The legal panel was led by Laura Shin, host of the Unchained podcast (check it out!). A number of the more prominent lawyers in the space attended to talk about legal aspects of initial coin offerings.

Although I would have liked to see some more actual discussion, the panel does provide some insights into the legal challenges of the space.

Topics explored by the legal panel include:

  • whether the American securities framework is the right way to go about the compliance of token sales,
  • what constitutes ‘utility’,
  • the SAFT and its influence on the legal scene,
  • considerations around incorporation structures, and
  •  general best practices for entrepreneurs.
Thijs Maas is a Dutch LLM student who developed a keen interest in the interplay between distributed ledger technologies and law. He started LawAndBlockchain.eu to help narrow the increasing gap between legal doctrine and regulatory challenges posed by blockchain-based asset classes.
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